Can Iraq’s Government Handle ISIS Without Becoming Oppressors Themselves?

hayder

Hayder Hamzoz

Isn’t it sad that the supporters for the country of Iraq are constantly working against the odds? With the frightening delevopment of the ISIS terrorists, Iraq has once again taken several steps back from potential stability and coexistance – 11 years after the outbreak of the war they didn’t start themselves.

Now the Americans are out and Iraq is left on their own to fight against the dark powers that seem overwhelmingly strong. Do they have the capacity to resist? I asked my friend, the human rights activist Hayder Hamzoz, how he saw the situation. He is coordinator of Iraqi Network for Social Media, a community for bloggers and citizen journalists in Iraq, and he has been very active in promoting development and human rights through social media. He sees dangers not only in the threats of ISIS but in how the Iraqi government is handling the situation:

The situation now is very bad outside Baghdad like in Diyala, Mosul, Kirkuk, Alanbar, and Salahaldeen,” he says. “The problem is that a lot of fake news are coming from ISIS through social media and we’re facing that through the trust news from the citizen there under the hashtag #insm_iq. 

This can bring many potential dangers for us (activists, my comment), like they can say you are supporting the ISIS terrorists because you don’t have direct tweets to support the army, this comes from the government. Also, from ISIS they will attack us at least in social media, unless they have group in Baghdad to follow us, because the community knows us, because our sharing about the daily life in Baghdad and other provinces, and they share the fake news. Also, from government’s side again, since we’re teaching the activists how to remove the banners from the banned social media; from the governments perspective we are doing something illegal. 

Can Iraq’s government handle the threat of the terrorists without becoming oppressors themselves? The challenge has two sides. I hope the activists won’t give up.

Photo: Copyright Hayder Hamzoz

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6 thoughts on “Can Iraq’s Government Handle ISIS Without Becoming Oppressors Themselves?

  1. The problem is that the US is supporting both sides. They have a history of “training” ISIS leaders (http://www.panorama.am/en/analytics/2014/06/25/william-engdahl/) – while giving Saudi Arabia the nod for providing them weaponry.

    Oil is the other important part of this equation. While it gets little attention in the US mainstream media, the ISIS have given de factor control of Kirkuk oil production to the Kurds. They, in turn, have broken the Arab embargo against selling oil to Israel: http://www.businessinsider.com/ayub-nuri-the-kurds-sending-oil-to-israel-is-a-message-2014-6?IR=T

    Obviously this makes banking heir Nathaniel Rothschild really happy, as his company owns a controlling share in all Kurdish oil: http://www.nesaranetwork.com/2014/06/21/rothschild-scion-takeover-of-kurdish-iraq-oil-co/

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    • Excellent job pointing much of this out. ISIS got in possession of these lethal advanced weaponry from supplies given by the U.S. CIA, because the U.S. will stop at nothing it appears to see Assad go in Syria. But of course when terrorism is aided in one country, there should be no reason to think their aims will stop there and now they’ve moved into Iraq. America unfortunately has learned very little if anything from 9/11, after militants the CIA armed and trained as part of the Mujahadeen turned around targeted the United States. To quote Rev. Jeremiah Wright, “Violence begets violence. Hatred begets hatred. And terrorism begets terrorism.” Southwestern Asia would be a completely different place today had it not been for constant imperialist interventions.

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