“I do, with much content, support Jordan’s role in fighting what’s called ISIS” – Jordanians on the Bombings of IS

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Moath Al-Kassasbeh

The world remains passive and unable to respond, it seems, while IS are slaughtering their way across the Middle East. But after the horrifying killing of the Jordanian pilot Moath Al-Kassabeh a new actor picked up weapons to fight the multi headed dragon: the Jordanian king.

Maybe it’s just the royal PR, but news went out that king Abdullah himself went up in the air to bomb IS, and that the Jordanian airforce intensified bombings against IS as a response to the murder. More than that, they quickly executed a few convicts and alleged terrorists, among them Sajida Al-Rishawi, who had been on death row for a failed suicide attempt since 2005, and whose appeal was still in process. The video footage of Al-Kassabeh reached internet on February 3rd, and Al-Rishawi and Al-Karbouly were hanged in the early hours of February 4th. The justice in these hastened decisions can definitely be questioned. In the war against IS it seems however that all normal rules are out of order. And Jordan seems to be the only actor at the moment this is willing – and able to? – take up the fight against IS. For a comment on this, I asked two of my close friends who are Jordanians, Rasha and Rami who are married, about their opinions. They have been working and studying in different regions all over the world and are currently living outside of Jordan.

“I am with the government in bombing ISIS because they are a real threat to Jordan and the region, but I am really worried about the consequences of this war”, Rasha said. “About Moath, when I knew that he was captured by ISIS, I expected he will be killed. However, I don’t expect him to be burned alive… When ISIS released the video about killing him, my heart broke. I was a little relieved when the government executed Sajida and the other guy who were sentenced to death long time ago and started a revenge for him. I was happy because Jordanian united against ISIS and we didn’t have a chaos in Jordan.”

Her husband Rami was even more decisive:

I do, with much content, support Jordan’s role in fighting what’s called ISIS. This gang has been committing brutal crimes against humanity and somebody has to stop them! Their barbarian acts of executing journalists, humanitarian field workers and, lately, the Jordanian pilot have revealed their insanity and lack of any ethical and humanitarian principle… They are a real threat to the region and their distorted ideology is a major threat to humanity.

Maybe this united force will be a turning point in the war against IS? I don’t know myself. But we are definitely onto a new path in this international crisis.

Photocredit: en.alalam.ir

We Need a Unified Approach on How to Tackle the IS Monster

When the news about the by IS murdered Jordanian pilot Moaz Al Kassabeh I wondered how can people become so barbaric. We have seen the case before, many times in our history, but no people have been so boasting and open about the horrifying crimes they are committing. After previous crimes against humanity, surviving criminals of the genocide in Rwanda, the Yugoslavian civil war have gone underground and denied their crimes. But IS just had to show the world how perverse they are, as if it’s all just a game on real life TV.

I wrote a blog post last summer about the origin of IS, “How Do You Become an ISIS terrorist?“, where I pointed out the failure of the previously well functioning Iraqi society as the starting factor for such a terrorist group to establish and become strong. That doesn’t mean that I don’t see the contributions of the non-Iraqi and non-Syrian IS-members who have happily flied in and are helping out in ruining the rest of already more or less collapsed societies. Why they are there is another discussion I’ll probably jump in to at another occasion (failed integration of immigrants in the West, identity crisis, I believe the factors are many). What I want to say today is that I hope the world takes joint action against IS and the members of this group, no matter what crimes they did commit or didn’t.

One of Swedish politicians, Mona Sahlin in the Social Democratic party, created a stir last year when she proclaimed that Swedish authorities should support returning Swedish citizens after they have been with IS. She spoke about counselling and support to their families, also said that the society should reintegrate them after they came back. This caused an outrage, some have afterwards claimed she said that Swedish authorities should give returning IS combatants jobs and welfare, something that seems like a twisted turn of Mona Sahlin’s statement. However, I do think this statement mirrors the global confusion and uncoordinated force to deal with the monster of IS. One state, Jordan, will execute terrorists as a punishment for lives taken, another one want to rehabilitate them, maybe without punishment. And this is exactly what benefits IS.

Please, world, get together for a unified grip on this ongoing crisis we’re in. It’s a global crisis that will push everyone away from each other, even when we’re far away from the war zone.

Authorities, punish the IS terrorists where ever they are. Yes, returnees will need counselling and support so as not to do what they did again and for themselves to understand why they did what they did. But that they should receive in prison. If they come back to Sweden or any other country where they belong, punish them for the crimes against humanity that they have committed or assisted others in committing. Yes, we need to see why the foreign terrorists are going to Syria and Iraq to murder and terrorise people – but they have still murdered and terrorised people. If we neglect the crimes these people have committed we are making an example of the fact that we don’t care about the people in Syria and Iraq. Those who have committed these crimes shouldn’t get away with it.

Governments, have a dialogue with each other, decide together how you will tackle this monster. Don’t run your own thing. This is an international problem and need to be dealt with as such.

People, don’t stop talking to each other. Keep inviting your neighbours for tea. Make new friends from groups you didn’t communicate with before. Don’t let differences between you and that other person stop you.

IS can be stopped, if we did it in 1945 we should be able to do it now, but only a unified international community can do it. If we give in to IS we give up our humanity. Don’t let these disturbed people take that from us.

Sameera My African Friend in Amman

Amman“You want to go see my friends? They’re African, they speak good English” my neighbor in Amman asked me one Thursday afternoon years back. In the sleepy little area we lived there were not a big variety among the neighbors, so I became curious and tagged along.

Long before that, no one knew when, the father of Sameera and her sisters left his country Nigeria, supposedly to go to Mekka, travelling by land for several months until he came to Jordan. For some reason, if money went out or whatever it could have been, Sameera’s father decided to stay there for a while. Back then Amman was just a village and foreigners a rarity, so rare that the authorities quite soon offered him a passport. There were a few other Africans in Amman though, and someone pointed out the houses to him: “Here lives an African family!” And so he met Sameera’s mother whose father originated from the Ivory Coast, and for a while became a lifetime; he never saw Nigeria again.

Sameera was cool and smart, too broad in her mind for the suburb where she had lived all her life. Her father, illiterate himself, decided that his six daughters were going to be educated, and sent them to college. To his son and other people he said: “No one is going to tell my daughters anything”. Probably he was the one to blame for their independency that stayed present even after he and their mother had passed away. They all worked and made their own money, only one of them getting married, to a Kenyan man that she said respected her freedom. The others saying they didn’t want the burden of being controlled. Sameera and her sisters fully identified as Africans, sticking to African satellite channels and music, even though they had never been. Later on, with the UN moving in big-scale to Amman the city became more international, with foreign women dressing in tank tops and Starbucks popping up in street corners. But the international vibes of a city often has a way of not reaching the original citizens, the ones limited by the conservative ways of condemning those different African girls that lived by themselves, worked for themselves, dressed in modern clothes.

I always had a good time at Sameera’s place and I wanted her to come visit me in Beirut when I went to stay there the upcoming year. She was up for it after some persuading. Collecting her best outfits, she called me a number of times before she left; “Can I have white jeans in Beirut? That’s cool there?”, and took a shared taxi for the eight hours ride.

She cried the first evening on my balcony and I got perplexed: what was wrong? But it was just the free spirit of Lebanon and the mixture of people that she saw. She was no longer the odd one; she was just one among many. “I’m sad because of all the beautiful things I see, I see nothing of this is in Amman”, she said.

That weekend was the best, we had so much fun. It was Beirut in the summer in the mid-2000s: clubs were open until the morning, people could still afford going out, Tiesto and Amr Diab was the DJs choice for the night. Our exotic appearance, the blonde girl and the black, was priceless. We didn’t pay entrance anywhere, the Buddha Bar DJ invited us to party with his crew, not understanding why such an urban girl like Sameera didn’t drink or wanting to date, and Sameera acted like she was born in the cosmopolitan city, showing off her amazing dancing skills that she rarely got to practice, pretending she was American when someone asked (“Hey I ain’t gonna see them again!”). When we grew tired of the company we told them we were going home, then hopped into a cab and went to the next club.

We’re not in touch anymore why I don’t share her real name or photo. But I hope she would agree on me sharing her story, because being a minority is never easy and she was a person that showed someone can grow different from her society and still remain her integrity, becoming the special person that she was. Or as Sameera said once, to a taxi driver in Amman that criticized her for being a Muslim and not covering herself:

Ammo, I am a Muslim and when I read the Qur’an and decide that I will cover, at that time I will cover. Until then I will mind my own business, and you mind yours.”

Photo credit: http://www.primetravels.com

Minorities in the Middle East

jo_ch-ceThe Middle East is a region full of minorities that won’t pass under the ethnicity of Arab, Persian or Turk. If watching Homeland one might think something else – I for example had no idea about the different cultures that coexisted in this region when I started travelling. As social integration is one of my passions I want to share some of my experiences with you, and also let people share their own stories.

A few years back I was invited to a family in one of the bleak, sundrenched suburbs in Amman.
“They are Russians” my friend said who brought me with her. It turned out it was a family of Chechnyan origin, incredibly hospitable, that we spent the afternoon and evening with.

It was a big family, many sisters and brothers came that afternoon with their own families and children, and all of them had married only to other Chechens. They were happy to talk about their background and told me how their relatives had fled Chechnya in the 19th century during the Caucasian war. It had been a long journey to reach Jordan, another Muslim country that they hoped would welcome them when they fled the oppression of the Russian central power.

In Jordan they were able to practise their religion without supression and were offered the Jordanian nationalities, not ending up in the vacuum for generations like many refugees do. They went to the same schools and universities and many became successful business men, like this family that now owned a series of supermarkets all over Amman. A special flag have been designed for the Chechen and Circassian minorities in the country, with the Chechen and Circassian flags merged and Hashemite crown on top, as a tribute to the country that had welcomed them.

But for many years they were completely cut off from their native country and relatives that they had left behind. Mail services didn’t exist and war was raging in Chechnya.

“We had our culture only”, one of the men told me. The original Chechen language became mixed up with Russian, as generations passed and many of the original Chechens were illiterate and couldn’t pass on the writing skills to their children.

Then in the 1990s one of the brothers decided to go. He went on his own and after much research was able to find distant relatives and the village from where they descended. He stayed for months and came back with some possessions from their relatives. A small wooden wheel now was hanging on the wall in the saloon in the Jordanian suburbian house, the tickets he had used travelling framed and decorating the other wall. The family was so proud of having found a part of their heritage. War and oppression may still be tormenting Chechnya, but in Jordan the Chechen minority had preserved their culture and pride.

Photo credit: www.crwflags.com